Wednesday, March 12, 2014

A scheme guide to changing longevity risk - Comment & Analysis - Pensions Expert

A scheme guide to changing longevity risk - Comment & Analysis - Pensions Expert

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Scientists propose the new in silico method for high throughput screening and ranking of the possible geroprotector drugs to fight aging

Aging is one of the major challenges of the modern society. The advances in biomedicine and healthcare systems have led to the unprecedented long lives of the population after the retirement leading to the increased burden on the economies. There is an urgent need to develop and validate interventions with geroprotective properties to increase the productive health spans of the working population and maintaining performance and avoiding loss of function.
Experiments with animal models already resulted in significant breakthroughs resulting in up to 1,000 percent increases in lifespans. But extrapolating these advances to humans or other mammals proved to be extremely challenging. Human live orders of magnitude longer than the short-lived model organisms and there is no comprehensive set of aging biomarkers, allowing to track the effects of the many drugs that may extend lifespan. We are also  different from other animals and the many drugs that work on mice do not work on humans.
To address these challenges the international team comprised of biogerontologists, geneticists, computer scientists and biomathematicians proposed using a computer simulation and laboratory validation approach using human cells and model organisms to predict what drugs may help fight aging in humans.
The Human Genome Project and the following revolution in sequencing and laboratory diagnostics resulted in the vast data on genetic and epigenetic profiles of cells and tissues from people of various ages. The proposed method uses this data to construct the cloud of molecular signalling pathways involved in aging and longevity and evaluates the effects of the very large number of drugs and drug combinations to simulate the young state of the cells and tissues. Scientists hope that this method may be used to find new drugs with aging-suppressive properties and predict the activity of the drugs that are already on the market. Also, people respond to the drugs differently and this method may be able to personalize the geroprotective therapy to the individual patients and help the drug companies conduct better clinical trials.
"There are thousands of compounds with known molecular targets and some  are already used in the clinic. Due to high cost and the time it takes to complete the experimental work, it may not be possible to test all of the effects of these drugs even in mice. And the fact that the drug works in mice does not guarantee the same effect in humans. There needs to be a better way to predict the efficacy of the drug in humans.  We proposed a method for doing that in silico using the multiple sources of data and we hope to validate this method in the very near future.", said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, the director of the Biogerontology Research Foundation in the UK. "Also, people are different, age at different rates and respond to drugs differently. The proposed method may be used to predict the personalized geroprotector regiments.", he added.
Many pharmaceutical companies already expressed their interest in bringing aging research into clinical practice, but the absence of the business models, accurate validation methods, and the inability to classify aging as the curable disease are major impediments to mainstream development of geroprotective drugs. In silico drug discovery may help accelerate this process. The group plans to present the results of their experimental work using this method at the Practical Applications of Aging Research Symposium at MipTek 2014 in Basel, Switzerland attended by over 3,000 delegates from the pharmaceutical industry.  
“The decreases in cost and increased availability of genetic and epigenetic research as well as the breakthroughs in computer technologies are already helping make better decisions in biomedicine. The proposed method may take the in silico approach to drug discovery to the next level. If the can validate it in the laboratory, and we are working on that as we speak, this may revolutionize aging research”, said Anton Buzdin, the director of the First Oncology Research and Advisory Center.


The paper describing the new approach to screening and ranking of geroprotective drugs was published in the reputable scientific journal Frontiers in Genetics.




Citation: Zhavoronkov A, Buzdin AA, Garazha AV, Borissoff N and Moskalev AA (2014). Signaling pathway cloud regulation for in silico screening and ranking of the potential geroprotective drugs. Front. Genet. 5:49. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2014.00049 - See more at: http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fgene.2014.00049/abstract#sthash.2qpLbytY.dpuf
Signaling pathway cloud regulation for in silico screening and ranking of the potential geroprote...

Signaling pathway cloud regulation for in silico screening and ranking of the potential geroprote...

Screening for new aging drugs using computer simulation
Aging is one of the major challenges of the modern society. The advances in biomedicine and healthcare systems have led to the unprecedented long lives of the population after the retirement leading to the increased burden on the economies. There is an urgent need to develop and validate interventions with geroprotective properties to increase the productive health spans of the working population and maintaining performance and avoiding loss of function.
Experiments with animal models already resulted in significant breakthroughs resulting in up to 1,000 percent increases in lifespans. But extrapolating these advances to humans or other mammals proved to be extremely challenging. Human live orders of magnitude longer than the short-lived model organisms and there is no comprehensive set of aging biomarkers, allowing to track the effects of the many drugs that may extend lifespan. We are also  different from other animals and the many drugs that work on mice do not work on humans.
To address these challenges the international team comprised of biogerontologists, geneticists, computer scientists and biomathematicians proposed using a computer simulation and laboratory validation approach using human cells and model organisms to predict what drugs may help fight aging in humans.
The Human Genome Project and the following revolution in sequencing and laboratory diagnostics resulted in the vast data on genetic and epigenetic profiles of cells and tissues from people of various ages. The proposed method uses this data to construct the cloud of molecular signalling pathways involved in aging and longevity and evaluates the effects of the very large number of drugs and drug combinations to simulate the young state of the cells and tissues. Scientists hope that this method may be used to find new drugs with aging-suppressive properties and predict the activity of the drugs that are already on the market. Also, people respond to the drugs differently and this method may be able to personalize the geroprotective therapy to the individual patients and help the drug companies conduct better clinical trials.
"There are thousands of compounds with known molecular targets and some  are already used in the clinic. Due to high cost and the time it takes to complete the experimental work, it may not be possible to test all of the effects of these drugs even in mice. And the fact that the drug works in mice does not guarantee the same effect in humans. There needs to be a better way to predict the efficacy of the drug in humans.  We proposed a method for doing that in silico using the multiple sources of data and we hope to validate this method in the very near future.", said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, the director of the Biogerontology Research Foundation in the UK. "Also, people are different, age at different rates and respond to drugs differently. The proposed method may be used to predict the personalized geroprotector regiments.", he added.
Many pharmaceutical companies already expressed their interest in bringing aging research into clinical practice, but the absence of the business models, accurate validation methods, and the inability to classify aging as the curable disease are major impediments to mainstream development of geroprotective drugs. In silico drug discovery may help accelerate this process. The group plans to present the results of their experimental work using this method at the Practical Applications of Aging Research Symposium at MipTek 2014 in Basel, Switzerland attended by over 3,000 delegates from the pharmaceutical industry.  
“The decreases in cost and increased availability of genetic and epigenetic research as well as the breakthroughs in computer technologies are already helping make better decisions in biomedicine. The proposed method may take the in silico approach to drug discovery to the next level. If the can validate it in the laboratory, and we are working on that as we speak, this may revolutionize aging research”, said Anton Buzdin, the director of the First Oncology Research and Advisory Center.


The paper describing the new approach to screening and ranking of geroprotective drugs was published in the reputable scientific journal Frontiers in Genetics.


Citation: Zhavoronkov A, Buzdin AA, Garazha AV, Borissoff N and Moskalev AA (2014). Signaling pathway cloud regulation for in silico screening and ranking of the potential geroprotective drugs. Front. Genet. 5:49. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2014.00049 - See more at: http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fgene.2014.00049/abstract#sthash.2qpLbytY.dpuf


Signaling pathway cloud regulation for in silico screening and ranking of the potential geroprote...

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Attracting a male in retirement

That's how it is done ;)

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Set your lifespan horizon to 150 and you will feel better!

Here is a Youtube video, where Michael Nuschke of RetirementSingularity.com interviews Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, a leading longevity researcher and author of "The Ageless Generation: How Advances In Biomedicine Will Transform The Global Economy". [Amazon link; http://goo.gl/LHAbF5 ]

Part 1 of 3 discusses the state of regenerative medicine, economic impacts of healthy life extension, roadblocks and promises, as well as China's emerging strength in biomedical research.

Alex on Facebook = https://www.facebook.com/biogerontology
Michael's blog = http://www.retirementsingularity.com/
Parts II and III will mention the socioemotional selectivity theory and how the perception of your lifespan horizons affects your behavior.


Friday, May 24, 2013

The urgent need to accelerate aging research and extend the retirement age – don't give aging a chance to ruin your life


The end of retirment by extending healthy life or by an unprecedented economic collapse
If you care about your current way of life, the prosperity of your children and grandchildren, this book is for you. It will change the way you see aging and the economy. Aging is no longer an inevitable process, we are standing on the brink of a scientific revolution that will extend our life and make it much more fun.

Accelerating aging research to extend healthy productive lifespan seems to be in everyone's best interest. There are few people on this planet, who would chose to age and gradually succumb to diseases of aging if they were given a choice to live longer and healthier lives.

However, up until recently, the many failed promises of science made many of us resistant to accepting the possibility of the interventions that may take us way beyond the lifespans of our parents and grandparents.
Well, now it is time to open up to these possibilities and get actively involved, because the urgency to accelerate aging research now stems from the economic fundamentals of the aging population in the developed countries.

This is also a critical moment in human history.  In the short term the economies of the developed countries can either prosper or collapse.

Aging populations in the developed countries are now the single biggest threat to the global economy. People that are retiring today and that are due to retire in the next decade are going to live extraordinarily long lives due to the advances in biomedicine and propagation of these advanced into the clinical setting.
 
 "The Ageless Generation: How Advances in Biomedicine Will Transform the Global Economy",  a book by Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD in very simple layman language drills down into the history of retirement and social security and the present state of the social security, healthcare and the unfunded liabilities of the developed countries. It also takes the reader on a tour of the laboratories in the US, Europe and China, where scientists toil on solving the complex puzzles of regenerative medicine, longevity genes and technologies that will extend our lifespans. Then it looks at the future of retirement and presents the real possibility of the near-term Economic Collapse. There are some solutions and policy proposals, but chances are very small that we will be able to avoid the crisis before we can significantly extend healthy lifespans.

The book will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in June 2013 and is available for pre-order at Amazon and most bookstores worldwide.

Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Ageless-Generation-Advances-Biomedicine-Transform/dp/0230342205/
Barnes and Noble: 
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-ageless-generation-alex-zhavoronkov/1113106743

The main idea of this book is that in record time the US must start a coordinated program to increase healthy productive lives of the two generations that are nearing retirement or the whole world will face several decades of economic decline and possible collapse. The need to fight aging is no longer an altruistic initiative, but a real economic necessity.

Recent advances in biomedicine will extend the lifespans of the two generations due to retire within the next twenty years; however, unless there are programs in place to keep them healthy and working, the burden of the aging population will drive the global economy into the state of depression or even worse. Developed countries should re-focus the research programs from just extending lifespans to extending health spans and the retirement age to remain solvent and this initiative must be led by the beating heart and the brain of the world's economy - the United States of America.

Every reader of this post must consider the possibility of radical extension of healthy life through biomedicine. One thing you should do right now is to stretch the expected horizons to 150 years.  Yes, it is possible! Even if we let some of the major advances that already happened to converge and reach the clinic, 150 years of life is the very minimum of what a 40-year old today should expect.

One way to prepare for it is to pack up and prepare yourself and your family to live through the economic collapse. Another way is to actively engage in supporting aging research by engaging in government lobbying, supporting research directly or even engaging in research personally.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Viagra or Cialis - Research Funding

I came across a very useful tool for biomedical research called the International Aging Research Portfolio. They are a non-profit initiative for tracking biotechnology and social sciences projects related to aging.

I did a search using Viagra OR Cialis and got the following results:

 Just Cialis got about $3 million in funding. So Viagra is still more popular in grant applications ;-)

Total Funding: $ 42,358,949
Number Of Funding: 133
Number Of Projects: 122



Project Funding
 
Project number
 
Project title
 
Investigators
 
Recipient organization
 
Funding organization
 
Year
 
Funding
5P50CA084944-05Center for psycho-oncology researchANTONI MICHAEL HOWARDUNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CORAL GABLESNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2003$2,217,0940
5P50CA084944-04Center for psycho-oncology researchANTONI MICHAEL HOWARDUNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CORAL GABLESNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2002$2,158,9300
5P50CA084944-03Center for psycho-oncology researchANTONI MICHAEL HOWARDUNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CORAL GABLESNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2001$2,101,8220
5P50CA084944-02Center for psycho-oncology researchANTONI MICHAEL HOWARDUNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CORAL GABLESNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2000$2,046,3840
1P50CA084944-01Center for psycho-oncology researchANTONI MICHAEL HOWARDUNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CORAL GABLESNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 1999$1,999,9990
5P01DK038452-23Cellular biology of renal function and diseaseBROWN DENNISMASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITALNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2009$1,754,6860
5P01DK038452-22Cellular biology of renal function and diseaseBROWN DENNISMASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITALNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2008$1,703,5770
5R01DA019048-04Prescription drug abuse among club drug usersINCIARDI JAMESAUNIVERSITY OF DELAWARENATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2008$575,3610
1RC1MH088480-01Phosphodiesterase-2 and mood disorders: target validation and drug discoveryO'DONNELL JAMESM,
ZHAN
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH 2009$483,3164
R01HL089297-03Regulation of cardiac stress responses by pde5aKASS ALANJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2010$467,0984
1R01HL079424-01Cardioprotective effects of pde-5 inhibitorsKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2005$454,7134
5R01HL079424-04Cardioprotective effects of pde-5 inhibitorsKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2008$454,2214
5R01HL079424-03Cardioprotective effects of pde-5 inhibitorsKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2007$450,5034
R01HL079424-05Cardioprotective effects of pde-5 inhibitorsKUKREJA CVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2010$448,5004
5R01HL079424-02Cardioprotective effects of pde-5 inhibitorsKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2006$440,6944
R01HL093432-02Regulation and function of cgmp dependent protein kinase in cardiac hypertrophyTAKIMOTOJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2010$410,0000
1R01HL093432-01A1Regulation and function of cgmp dependent protein kinase in cardiac hypertrophyTAKIMOTO EIKIJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2009$410,0004
1R01HL089297-01A1Regulation of cardiac stress responses by pde5aKASS DAVID ALANJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2008$409,4504
5R01HL089297-02Regulation of cardiac stress responses by pde5aKASS DAVID ALANJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2009$409,4504
1R01DA018572-01A2Adulterants, drugs, coingestants and associated hiv riskBOYER EDWARDWUNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2005$389,3800
5R01DK040029-19Molecular control of cgmp signaling by pkgs and pdesCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2007$386,9454
5R01DK040029-18Molecular control of cgmp signaling by pkgs and pdesCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2006$386,8924
5R01DK040029-17Molecular control of cgmp signaling by pkgs and pdesCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2005$384,6634
R01HL093685-03Cardioprotective signaling following phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitionKUKREJA CVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2010$373,7504
5R01HL093685-02Cardioprotective signaling following phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitionKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2009$373,7504
5R01DK040029-16Molecular control of cgmp signaling by pkgs and pdesCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2004$373,4614
1R01HL093685-01Cardioprotective signaling following phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitionKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2008$372,5004
2R01EY010843-15A1Regulation of retinal cgmp phosphodiesterasesARTEMYEV NIKOLAIOUNIVERSITY OF IOWANATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE 2008$371,0904
5R01EY010843-16Regulation of retinal cgmp phosphodiesterasesARTEMYEV NIKOLAIOUNIVERSITY OF IOWANATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE 2009$370,9724
R01EY010843-17Regulation of retinal cgmp phosphodiesterasesARTEMYEV OUNIVERSITY OF IOWANATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE 2010$370,2604
2R37HL051045-10Protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathyKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2006$365,6404
2R01DK040029-15Molecular control of cgmp signaling by pkgs and pdesCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2003$362,5834
5R37HL051045-11Protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathyKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2007$361,6984
5R01DA018572-02Adulterants, drugs, coingestants and associated hiv riskBOYER EDWARDWUNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2006$358,8020
R01EY005798-22Cgmp and photoreceptor functionCOTE HUNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRENATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE 2010$358,3964
5R37HL051045-12Protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathyKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2008$357,2484
1R01DK082956-01Exercise training improves erectile dysfunction in diabetes: role of central mechPATEL KAUSHIKPUNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA MEDICAL CENTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2009$356,4004
5R37HL051045-13Protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathyKUKREJA RAKESHCVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2009$354,5614
R37HL051045-14Protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathyKUKREJA CVIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2010$354,5614
R01DK082956-02Exercise training improves erectile dysfunction in diabetes: role of central mechPATEL PUNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA MEDICAL CENTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2010$352,8364
5R01DA018572-03Adulterants, drugs, coingestants and associated hiv riskBOYER EDWARDWUNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2007$348,3900
5R01DA018572-04Adulterants, drugs, coingestants and associated hiv riskBOYER EDWARDWUNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2008$341,5434
5R01CA124996-03The role of myeloid suppressor cells in tumor-specific toleranceBORRELLO IVANMJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2009$336,0364
5R01HL073895-05Resistance artery adaptation in hypertensive pregnancyOSOL GEORGEJUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT &ST AGRIC COLLEGENATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2009$332,0820
5R01HL073895-04Resistance artery adaptation in hypertensive pregnancyOSOL GEORGEJUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT &ST AGRIC COLLEGENATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2008$332,0820
1R01DK058277-01A1Molecular mechanisms of pde5 regulationCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2001$323,8314
5R37DK053832-11Ca2+ sparks and urinary bladder smooth muscle excitabilityNELSON MARKTUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT &ST AGRIC COLLEGENATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2009$323,0004
2R37DK053832-10Ca2+ sparks and urinary bladder smooth muscle excitabilityNELSON MARKTUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT &ST AGRIC COLLEGENATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2008$323,0004
5R01DK058277-02Molecular mechanisms of pde5 regulationCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2002$322,9414
5R01DK058277-03Molecular mechanisms of pde5 regulationCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2003$322,7634
5R01DK058277-05Molecular mechanisms of pde5 regulationCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2005$322,7634
5R01DK058277-04Molecular mechanisms of pde5 regulationCORBIN JACKIE DAVIDVANDERBILT UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2004$322,7634
R37DK053832-12Ca2+ sparks and urinary bladder smooth muscle excitabilityNELSON TUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT &ST AGRIC COLLEGENATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2010$319,7704
3R01HL093432-01A1S1Regulation and function of cgmp dependent protein kinase in cardiac hypertrophyTAKIMOTO EIKIJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE 2009$313,9124
1R01CA124996-01A1The role of myeloid suppressor cells in tumor-specific toleranceBORRELLO IVANMJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2007$311,6004
5R01CA124996-02The role of myeloid suppressor cells in tumor-specific toleranceBORRELLO IVANMJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITYNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2008$311,6004
5R01NS029740-14Regulation and function of cyclic gmp in the cnsMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2003$302,0004
5R01NS029740-15Regulation and function of cyclic gmp in the cnsMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2004$302,0004
5R01NS029740-13Regulation and function of cyclic gmp in the cnsMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2002$302,0004
2R01NS029740-12Regulation and function of cyclic gmp in the cnsMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2001$302,0004
1R01NR007971-01Treatment of ed in patients treated for prostate cancerBRUNER DEBORAHWAMERICAN COLLEGE OF RADIOLOGYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH 2001$300,9830
5R01GM083926-02Regulation of cellular functions by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 8BEAVO JOSEPHAUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2009$296,4004
1R01GM083926-01A1Regulation of cellular functions by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 8BEAVO JOSEPHAUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2008$296,4004
R01GM083926-03Regulation of cellular functions by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 8BEAVO AUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2010$293,4364
1R01GM084700-01A2Structural biology of gaseous messenger signalingRAMAN S,
VEERARAGHAVAN
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HLTH SCI CTR HOUSTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2008$292,0420
7R01GM084700-03Structural biology of gaseous messenger signalingRAMAN S,
VEERARAGHAVAN
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORENATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2009$291,6020
5R01NR007971-02Treatment of ed in patients treated for prostate cancerBRUNER DEBORAHWAMERICAN COLLEGE OF RADIOLOGYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH 2002$286,9410
5R01NS029740-17Regulation and function of cgmp in the nervous systemMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2008$269,5004
5R01NS029740-18Regulation and function of cgmp in the nervous systemMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2009$269,5004
2R01NS029740-16A2Regulation and function of cgmp in the nervous systemMORTON DAVIDBOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2007$268,9904
R01NS029740-19Regulation and function of cgmp in the nervous systemMORTON BOREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE 2010$266,8054
R21CA149536-01Acceptance and commitment therapy for erectile dysfunction following radical prosNELSON JSLOAN-KETTERING INSTITUTE FOR CANCER RESNATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 2010$249,1254
2R01GM059791-05A2Substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity of pdeKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2005$247,4850
5R01GM059791-06Substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity of pdeKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2006$241,6690
5R01GM059791-08Substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity of pdeKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2008$234,6614
5R01GM059791-07Substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity of pdeKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2007$234,6610
5R01DK055017-06Gene therapy of diabetic penile endothelial dysfunctionWESSELLS HUNTERUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2004$228,0004
5R01DK055017-04Gene therapy of diabetic penile endothelial dysfunctionWESSELLS HUNTERUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2002$228,0004
5R01DK055017-05Gene therapy of diabetic penile endothelial dysfunctionWESSELLS HUNTERUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2003$228,0004
5R01DK055017-03Gene therapy of diabetic penile endothelial dysfunctionWESSELLS HUNTERUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2001$228,0004
3R01GM059791-08S1Substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity of pdeKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2009$217,5420
5R21AG027468-02No/cgmp/creb pathway enhancers for treatment of alzheimer's diseaseARANCIO OTTAVIOCOLUMBIA UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCESNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING 2008$201,1704
3M01RR001032-25S3-0732Impact of viagra (tm) on treatment satisfactionSPARK RICHARDBETH ISRAEL DEACONESS MEDICAL CENTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES 2000$193,9160
3M01RR001032-25S4-0732Impact of viagra (tm) on treatment satisfactionSPARK RICHARDBETH ISRAEL DEACONESS MEDICAL CENTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES 2000$193,9160
1R01GM059791-01A1Crystal struct. of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesteraseKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2000$187,9794
5R01GM059791-03Crystal struct. of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesteraseKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2002$181,8754
5R01GM059791-04Crystal struct. of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesteraseKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2003$181,8754
5R01GM059791-02Crystal struct. of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesteraseKE HENGMINGUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES 2001$181,7194
7R01DK055017-02Gene therapy of diabetic penile endothelial dysfunctionWESSELLS HUNTERUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2000$177,4874
5R01NR007971-03Treatment of ed in patients treated for prostate cancerBRUNER DEBORAHWAMERICAN COLLEGE OF RADIOLOGYNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH 2003$166,5770
R03DA026737-02The nexus of drugs, sex networks, hiv and syphilis in young african american msmDOHERTY AUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2010$146,3490
1R03DA026737-01The nexus of drugs, sex networks, hiv and syphilis in young african american msmDOHERTY IRENEAUNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILLNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2009$146,2680
CIHR-937113Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in muscular dystrophyPETROF JohnMeakins Christie Labs (Quebec)CIHR - Institute of musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis 2010$140,5314
3R37DK053832-11S2Ca2+ sparks and urinary bladder smooth muscle excitabilityNELSON MARKTUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT &ST AGRIC COLLEGENATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES 2009$100,0014
5R03DA021259-02Emerging trends of tryptamine use: contexts &risksKELLY BRIANCPURDUE UNIVERSITY WEST LAFAYETTENATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 2008$74,7250
CIHR-937113Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in muscular dystrophyPETROF JohnMeakins Christie Labs (Quebec)CIHR - Institute of musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis 2009$70,2664
CIHR-919754Cervical cancer and sexuality: effects of a psychoeducational intervention and sildenafil on sexual arousal, relationship satisfaction, and quality of life after hysterectomyBROTTO AnneUNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIACIHR - Institute of gender and Health 2008$58,5000
CIHR-919754Cervical cancer and sexuality: effects of a psychoeducational intervention and sildenafil on sexual arousal, relationship satisfaction, and quality of life after hysterectomyBROTTO AnneUNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIACIHR - Institute of gender and Health 2009$58,5000
CIHR-919754Cervical cancer and sexuality: effects of a psychoeducational intervention and sildenafil on sexual arousal, relationship satisfaction, and quality of life after hysterectomyBROTTO AnneUNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIACIHR - Institute of gender and Health 2010$55,0000
3R01EY010843-16S1Regulation of retinal cgmp phosphodiesterasesARTEMYEV NIKOLAIOUNIVERSITY OF IOWANATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE 2009$54,082